Ringworm Causes Psoriasis and It Is Contagious

Eventually psoriasis is really the fungus! Yes, it is the fungal infection of the skin and it is contagious.

I am not saying that it is just fungal infectionAutonomic Nervous System dysfunction plays major role but what causes the primary immune reaction or suspected vasoconstriction in the skin?

Scaly plaques are full of bacteria no doubt about that but the primary cause of immune reaction and the reason why psoriasis plaque develop may be the same as in a disease called Tinea corporis generally known under the name ringworm.

What causes ringworm?

Ringworm.
Image source: CDC/Dr. Lucille K. Georg Creation Date: 1969

Ringworm (this term in medicine is referred as to – Tinea) is a fungal infection caused by dermatophyte fungus of the 3 genera: Microsporum, Epidermophyton and Trichophyton.

Depending on where the infection is localized the disease is called Tinea corporis (body), Tinea capitis (scalp), Tinea pedis (foot), Tinea unguium (nails – onychomycosis), etc…

The fungi that cause this disease are common organisms living on the normal skin of healthy person. However when there is some opportunity the fungus may spread and induce a rash or more serious skin lesions.

I think that one of those more serious skin lesions we call psoriasis.

Just look at the next photo where you can see the ringworm and psoriasis plaque side by side in one person.

The smaller patch is the guttate psoriasis, the bigger patch is ringworm.

The smaller patch is the guttate psoriasis, the bigger patch is ringworm.

The smaller patch is the guttate psoriasis plaque. The bigger patch is (probably) the fungal infection – at least the most dermatologists would say that after the first examination of the rash.

So it is very possible that psoriasis is “just” a fungal infection of the skin caused by the diminished blood flow in the upper part of the skin due to Autonomic Nervous System dysfunction.

The only difference between the ringworm and psoriasis is that in psoriasis the Autonomic Nervous System is underperforming and fungus can spread. It is easily deducted from the act that psoriasis spreads symmetrically. Basically due to localized vasoconstriction on the same spots on both sides of the body.

Psoriasis is really caused by ringworm fungus?

Probably yes.

So what about the differences between psoriasis patch and ringworm rash?

The fact that psoriasis spreads symmetrically and it is more scaly mostly in the center of the lesions when compared to ringworm rash (Tine corporis).

Those two parameters could be easily explained by Autonomic Nervous System caused vasoconstriction (low blood flow also potentiated by coagulation cascade – fibrin and platelets aggregation) in psoriasis. When this happens the ringworm fungi can infect the skin more easily and mostly the immune system is not capable of killing it due to decreased blood flow in the area.

Proofs that psoriasis is the fungal infection

1. Broken off hair

One of the symptoms of fungal infections that cause Tinea corporis or Tinea capitis (fungal infection of the body and scalp respectively) is hair damage at the place of infected area. In case of Tinea capitis it is clearly visible that the hair is missing – bald patches on the scalp form usually the circles.

Broken off hair caused by Tine capitis. Image source: Pai VV, Hanumanthayya K, Tophakhane RS, Nandihal NW, Kikkeri NN. Clinical study of Tinea capitis in Northern Karnataka: A three-year experience at a single institute. Indian Dermatol Online J [serial online] 2013 [cited 2015 Jun 27];4:22-6. Available from: http://www.idoj.in/text.asp?2013/4/1/22/105461 Broken off hair caused by Tine

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24 Responses

  1. Shirley P. Hyler says:

    I have had psoriaias for 15 Years alomost died taking Enbral five yrs ago also another time I take one shot wekly .8 Methorate keeps it somewhat bearable Its most horrible disease my age does not help Thanks for the latest information hope a cure comes to past Bless all the people who have to live with this disease..

    • John says:

      I am sorry but I can guarantee that cure will NEVER be developed and marketed. The reason is money. Corporations need making money and disease-free humans won’t pay.

  2. P A Deshpande says:

    Good Info

    • John says:

      Thank you!

      Some people are angry at me because I have written that “psoriasis is contagious”. They don’t understand or did not read that Autonomic Nervous System function needs to be altered by stress or infection, thick blood or deficiency in order to allow the psoriasis causing fungi to grow on the skin.

  3. david says:

    good info, thank you. I have a stiff neck and my neck, head/scalp/face is the worse area with psoriasis. I feel like the lack of circulation, constant touching and topical steroids contribute to stubborn spots too. More reason to get a hair cut.

  4. ghul says:

    interesting stuff. apart from psoriasis i got several spots on my body with fungal dermatitis.

    • John says:

      So it is easier for you to accept that psoriasis is fungal infection. Many people with psoriasis have or had fungal rash…

      It is so simple – dry, scaly, red, itchy – skin; doctors say it is PSORIASIS! I say it is fungal infection. It is so simple that everybody is ignoring it – fungus!

  5. Lucy says:

    Thank you for another great article !!
    There is something effective against this infection Tinea?

    • John says:

      Thank you!

      The cause is Autonomic Nervous System dysfunction not the fungi living naturally on the skin even in healthy people.

      We need to improve the blood flow by restoring the adrenaline sensitivity (by hypoglycemic diet, raising the cAMP levels (by forskolin), lowering the hypercoagulation (bile acids/artichoke, forskolin), increase ATP production (by B-complex vitamins, magnesium, zinc, omega 3…), fight off the internal infections like fungi, bacteria and viruses (by removing the infected teeth/root canal teeth, no sugar diet, essential oils, herbs, vitamin D3, enzymes,…).

      You can kill the fungi on the skin with Iodine or some antifungal cream but it is useless because psoriasis returns after discontinuation of the topical application.

  6. Lucy says:

    A very complete response
    Thank you!

  7. THOMAS C IRWIN says:

    PEOPLE;TRASH.

    LISTEN TO ME FOR JUST A MOMENT PLEASE:
    WHAT YOU ARE ALL BEING TOLD HER BY THIS IMBOCELE IS PURE AND UTTER TRASH.THERE IS NO CONNECTION BETWEEN PSORIASIS AND RINGWORM OR ANY OTHER FUNGAL INFECTION.TO TAKE AS TRUTH ABOUT HAIR LOSS AND FUNGAL INFECTION IS TOTALLY LAUGHABLE,THE PHOTOGRAPHS USED TO PROOVE A POINT IS PATHETIC,THE PHOTOGRAPHS ARE TAKEN FROM CADAVERS FOR GOODNESS SAKE!
    PLEASE DO YOURSELVES A BIG FAVOUR AND STOP SUBSCRIBING TO THIS SITE,AND DONT TAKE AS GOSPEL EVERYTHING YOU ARE BEING FED INFORMATION FROM A LUNATIC WHO CAN SPOUT ANYTHING AFTER READING FROM OLD MEDICAL BOOKS AND MEDICAL PAPERS NEVER PUBLISHED BECAUSE THEY ARE UTTER TRASH

    THERE IS NO REASON TO BELEIVE A WORD COMMING FROM THE WARPED MIND OF THESE IDIOTS,THEY SHOULD BE MADE TO WALK AROUND WEARING A “DANGER TO PUBLIC HEALTH”NOTICE AROUND THEIR PATHETIC NECKS FOR THE REST OF THEIR PATHETIC LIVES.

    YOURS HONESTLY
    THOMAS C IRWIN

    • John says:

      Thomas,

      I already replied to you on Google+ and I stated that I respect your opinion.

      And that is why I allowed your comment to be published here.

      However, you still name calling me without real data where I failed in presenting my theory.

      You say I am an “IMBOCELE”.

      Psoriasis plaques are spots on the skin where there is *limited* blood flow caused by Autonomic Nervous System – constricted blood vessels.

      Yeast and fungal pathogens live on the skin – healthy skin; on the places where there is limited blood flow they create psoriasis plaques.

      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1594634/
      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17727364

      What is the Dandruff?

      Dandruff is very similar to psoriasis and is confirmed to be caused by Malassezia yeast.

      That is why antifungal shampoo works for dandruff.

      But if there is Autonomic Nervous System dysfunction – constricted blood vessels – then dandruff is chronic… and we call it psoriasis instead of dandruff.

      Yes, the photos of fungi decomposing the hair are from dead body but those photos are just an illustration how fungi invade the hair.

      If fungi can cause condition called – ringworm or nail fungus – by attacking the skin of living human do you think that it is impossible for them to attack the hair?

      If you do not like this website then why do you visiting this blog months after our discussion on Google+?

      You call the idiots people writing this blog because they endangering the public health?

      How?

      I would say that lifelong prescription of ciclosporine, methotrexate, glucocorticoids and biologic drugs is endangering of health of the people.

      All those drugs do not treat the cause just symptoms and leads to cancer, nervous system damage, immune system damage and serious life threatening infection – bacterial, viral and fungal.

      http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25496045
      http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736%2814%2961704-9/abstract

      I never said that I am a doctor and all information on this blog is just for informational purposes. Everything is just my theory based on scientific papers I know.

  8. Teresa Neri says:

    I had ringworm at the age of fifteen,I was given a topical cream and it went away. The symptom has never returned. In my mid fourties I sarted with dry itchy patches. I went to the Dermatologist,she gave a cream it did nothing. I tried a different Dermatologist she gave a cream for psoriasis it worked but every year it comes back. So they are not the same and if were contagious,everyone in my family would have it. On the other hand ringworm is contagious and it was pass on to me by my neice.

  9. ghul says:

    cool article

  10. John says:

    This may or may not be related, but I clearly recall my son (12 at the time) having small white circles on his head after a haircut. I took him to the doctor and they assumed it was ringworm and gave him a shot. The next day he had 2 red spots on his leg which developed into psoriasis. It became worse and on his scalp and body. Although topicals somewhat worked, no medications seem to work other than the latest which is Stelara. I know people may find it hard to believe but was it just coincidence that the next day he had the 2 red spots?

    • John says:

      1. They gave him the shot of what?

      2. So do you believe or disagree that psoriasis has a fungal origin?

      • will says:

        you are on to something. i gotvring worm then with in 2 wks scalp psorisis. met a 15 yo boy today same thing just happen to him. it also grows in arterial plaque caused heart trouble in me. had bypass surgery. would likevto know how to kill fungud in body. feel it still in my whole body. guts too. yeast oder from sweat too. any advice?

        • John says:

          Prescription drugs may be useful in severe cases even though they are hard on the liver.

          Very effective natural anti-fungals are cassia oil, oregano oil, coconut oil, Saccharomyces boulardii,…

  11. RJ says:

    So maybe this explains why ALL my psoriasis went away when I took itraconazole for ringworm.

    Here’s my story: I am probably 50-70% covered when I decided to finally see a dermatologist. Before that, my GP prescribed prednisone to control my plaques and inflammation, it works as long as I’m taking it, BUT came back for much worst after stopping. The spots where my previous patches/plaques were much more inflamed, leaked fluids that forms to yellowish crust. Even my neck that has no plaques prior to taking prednisone didn’t survived the onslaught of withdrawal. It took them 2 months or more to subside before returning to normal patches of psoriasis. Those were the worst days of my life. I decided to never take that medicine again and just live with what I have.

    After a year, I decided to see a dermatologist for the first time. She wasn’t so sure of skin condition that I have, cause the patches on my thighs looks like psoriasis but on my stomach she said might be tinea/ringworm. She goes with the tinea route, performed liver-enzyme test, prescribed lamisil and itraconazole (2x a day for a week). She also took some scales on my tummy for fungal test (which turned out negative) and asked me to return in two weeks.

    I’m only in my 2-3 day of itraconazole when I noticed that my patches all around my body stopped flaking and fading. After taking itraconazole for a week, I remained clear for 2 weeks before they started re-appearing again. I consulted my derma and she performed biopsy (after 3 weeks, result was psoriasis). She didn’t want me to take itraconazole again, said that I have to let my body rest from it for a month. She gave me moisturizing creams and some steroid creams (forgot the name, usage of 2 weeks on/off) which has 50-50% chance of working. And when it worked, my plaques would re-appear just 2 days after stopping using of those cream.

    She then prescribed much stronger cream (halobetasol) (2 weeks on/off again). Halobetasol worked much better than previous cream, but just like before, psoriasis would re-appear after 2-3 days. It also has nasty withdrawal side effects just like prednisone, I am miserable during my 2-week resting period, so I stopped applying and let my skin recover naturally. I’m steroid-free for 2 months now and my skin is still recovering from withdrawal.

    Now, I’m wondering: my biopsy result was psoriasis, fungal test for my scales was negative and yet itraconazole, an antifungal drug completely cleared my skin (atleast for couple of weeks). I completely forgot about itraconazole (that only worked for me without nasty side effects) until reading this article. I guess that will be my maintenance drug for this condition.

    • John says:

      Corticoids (creams) are probably the worst idea for psoriasis.

      It is common to have negative biopsy for fungus – perhaps hard to culture (grow in a Petri dish) or there is some other cause.

      But I would not bother thinking if it is fungal infection of the skin because those with skin fungal infections have (in very most cases) fungal infections inside.

      If antifungal drug worked it is almost sure that you have bad digestion and fungal/yeast infection in the digestive system.

      Psoriasis is both – the Autonomic Nervous System dysfunction + fungal(dermatophyte)/yeast infection.

      Fungal infection in the body may cause systemic inflammation commonly seen in psoriatics – http://www.psoriasisdietplan.com/2014/12/fungal-infection-and-systemic-inflammation/

      Itraconazole is not a good maintenance drug due to its toxicity.

      SCD and even better monosaccharide based diet is the way to go + Nystatin if needed. Nystatin is poorly absorbed from the digestive system into the blood so it may be used as a “maintenance drug”.

      In some countries like Germany it is sold over-the-counter without the prescription.

  1. September 14, 2015

    […] This type of hair damage with sample photos is more deeply discussed in one of my previous posts Ringworm causes psoriasis and it is contagious. […]

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