Cortisol – The Chronic Inflammatory Diseases and Why Doctors Fail

If your psoriasis or any other chronic health problem developed after a stressful period or event in your life this blog post might be very useful for you.

This article will be a little bit difficult to understand completely so you may want to read it twice but I think it is worthy to understand the ideas and evidence presented here in the next lines. Therefore it is written somehow with repeating parts in order to make it easier for you to understand it.

In this article I want to explain to you why high or low cortisol does not matter as much as you might think.

Because what really matters is how well or bad the cells respond to cortisol. You may have “low” cortisol on blood tests (or saliva tests if you want) and it may work much efficiently than “high” levels of cortisol in some other person.

The sensitivity of cells to cortisol is what really matters.

I think that unless a person has very low levels of cortisol (like in Addison’s disease) the numbers on the test results are a weak marker of the underlying problem of some chronic disease in any individual.

Summary

  • How do chronic inflammatory diseases start?
  • Is it possible to reverse chronic inflammatory diseases with high success and fast?
  • Cortisol – is it bad when it is HIGH or LOW?
  • Infections cause cortisol related problems
  • Why probiotics do not work?
  • Night sweats cause
  • Yeast smelling sweat
  • PTSD, hypoglycemia, inflammatory diseases, anxiety, panic attacks

I believe that most things you learned about cortisol, chronic inflammation and reversing the health issues are not so.

And I really do not know why so many people who write about the cortisol and inflammatory diseases do not do their homework and instead write incomplete or very general information in their articles.

Most articles are all about high cortisol levels, how it’s bad to have high cortisol levels and what to do to bring them down.

Sure, high cortisol is a big problem but why don’t you say also that many people who are in advanced stages of their diseases have low(er) cortisol levels or at least the body is not very responsive to it?

Would you recommend to lower the cortisol levels for them even more?

Many would disagree and say “yes, because the cortisol levels are high in chronic inflammatory diseases…”.

Well, as I said above, even if the cortisol levels were high in absolute numbers they may still be relatively low compared to something else – maybe the levels of proinflammatory cytokines? TNF-alpha, IL-1,…?

The proof of this is that people with chronic inflammatory diseases are often less prone to catch a cold.

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